quick_draw

 Sudden Fiction is like a “quick” draw contest: prompt > draw > fire.. It’s all over in nine hundred and ninety nine words         or less. This ain’t no time to choke there hombre. Like the sun at high noon, your mouth goes dry, and it’s time to show what-your-made-of; after all, isn’t that what people like us like to do … write.

Sudden Fiction projects from my pen using as a mode of creativeness: the objective correlative. or some such. As much as I love and use adverbs, and adjectives to color my long verse; the metaphor fills my needs so much the better in this genre of sun baked dust and cordite.

I’ve always liked this following piece I put together some time ago. It just kind of rolls down-hill and ends on an emotional step.

 

 Dead at High Noon

by: G.K. Brannen

 

Cordite filled the air;

twas in my nostrils, twas in my eyes,

twisted left, twisted right

Cordite filled the air

Poncho was fast,

faster’n I ever seen.

Poncho was quick,

quicker’n I ever been.

The gun jumped this away,

my finger stroked the trigger.

Muh arm numbed right away;

the air got stiller.

The middle of the

street.   Blood-guts “n”

gore. Dog howl, hoot-owl

night-owl        gone.

The breeze reeked of

spent-powder, deadly as

we go. Everth’n that

was      dead at high-noon.

 

Writing “flash or sudden” fiction has just kind of rolled on me like a soft tide. I’m in the process of longer short story writing and, of course, academia writing; thus I need a mental break, and short poetic/non-poetic, rhyme and non-rhyme prose allows that relief to the psyche: bless our craniums anyway.

I’m sure I missed something I wanted to say … it’ll come to me.

best,

G.