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Nicholas C. Burbules made that statement in a scholarly paper he wrote on the occupation of editing in a culturally diverse world.

Said another way: when I send in a piece of fiction for publication in a magazine, book, or for that matter … a professor to grade: if said piece of prose is not up to a particular editor’s level, or a particular instructor’s literary range of writing (off setting problems with grammar, punctuation, and correct word usage of course), then isn’t that indeed a form of cultural imperialism? 

Who is really to say what good writing is? Has it to do with the rhetorical subscript set by some unseen source as to what is acceptable. Is it the readership of said piece that accounts for what is quality?

I dare say: “He who rules the present  – rules the past;  and in turn, rules the standards set to rule the present.”  Is an oxymoron at work here?

I suppose there must be some standards by which we live our lives. Ahh … the irony of it all.

Best to all,

G.

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When I was but a wee child enrolled in a small, rural schoolhouse, we had a book mobile that would visit , if I recall rightly, once every week or maybe two. I remember when the book-mobile was scheduled, recess was immediately called, and the whole of the student population (all 23 or so of us along with the one schoolmarm) would be allowed to plunder the book rows seeking a literary adventure.

That was the spark!

The fire has never been extinguished.

My book titles have grown up a bit; I’ve moved from Uncle Arthur’s “Bedtime Stories” > J.R.R. Tolkien >Justin Torres’ “We The Animals,” and everywhere in between.. Signifcant is my passion for the authors of the Romantic  &  Modernistic Era’s.

So, you may ask, what the heck has this got to do with anything.

I would like to think that the  youth of Generation “Z” will suffer the same passions as I.

Look at the commercials: cell-phones for 8 year olds …. really? On the bright side: there is an app for book downlods, audio books, and more information on the WEB then all the hardback “Encyclopedias” I could have ever purchased. All my books that I have retained, possessed, given-away, thrown- away, and thought of, but never obtained, can now be held in the palm of my hand. I must say – that is impressive..

I do have to admit: it just doesn’t sound the same … about “snuggling up with a good ipad.”

It’s a brave new world out there.

Happie New Year Everyone!

best,

g.

Virginia Woolf applies this statement when defining the role of the “lift-man” in her novel, To the Lighthouse. What an extra ordinary piece of work from many POV’s.

Slave class can be rendered into many different definitions. I believe so many people consider the word “slave” as applying to: Africans brought to this country in the early the progression period to work the fields, etc of both the Southern and Northern land-owners/ wealthy gentry and founding “fathers” of this country. But, that issue is not my thesis of this post. 

I would like to consider applying that connotation to our “lower to middle class.” By this I mean: teachers and professors that we count on to educate our children, and in some cases, senior-citizens like myself. I, as an ongoing academic, get to know my professors on levels few 20-year-old college students do. I see the effort demanded of them: time, continuing self-education, demands to “publish” so as to secure their tenure, a country that blames the educators first because our children’s intelligence is ranked so low within the world educational levels, etc. Our universities are filled with academics that have taught 25 – 30 yrs and more. If the truth be known … most can’t afford to retire. (I know, a lot of ordinary folks are in that boat; but just about all the professionals I’m speaking of have a Doctorate Degree). We’re talking years of “higher/continuing” education just to secure their job. (People say: “Well, they chose that career!” … And, an honorable career it is.)

But, don’t you think there’s something wrong when a society demands an institution to pass this child because he/her has the potential to become a great sports figure and earn millions of dollars. Money earned off the backs of the elected to carry that person (deserving or not; education be dammed) on to the “promised land of sportsman extordinaire.”

Is that the same as a “slave class?”

I would like to add an argument for the many talented athletes that I so love to watch on the weekends. I applaud their work ethics, their ability to deal with the social demands put on them, and the many sacrifices they do make for my entertainment.

But really, is anyone worth $160 million, or whatever some of these folks get paid, … really???????

What about the people: fireman, policeman, military, and so many more, that go in harm’s way so I have a safe place to live. Aren’t they worth more than my gratitude? What about the educators that try to guide our children to into adulthood so they will one day inherit and take care of us.

Are we the slave class??

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Everyone … Please vote!!! And, please vote your conscience.

Have a greatdae!

G.

“Summertime … and the liv’n is easy””

Bye! Bye! till fall!!!

Have a good one all.

G.

Does life hold that for everyone?  Leisure while Working? If not – it should!

I been reading a non-fiction narrative called Crafting the Personal Essay by Dinty W. Moore, and in this essay, the author points out how work, leisure, and humor can conbine into a very “rich” experience. He questions the art of work and that of leisure; arguing that there are many pleasures to be found through, maybe not enjoying the job you have, but how you admire your ability at doing that particular task. The message sent is: to admire your body and mental control of the feats you do, and find pride in your physical stealth to accomplish a job of quality whether its digging a ditch, cleaning laundry, building a structure or office work. All feats of achievement should add a bit of leisure through the pride you hold within yourself.

I, like most others, do the everyday tasks with some haste and less then 100% need for perfection. I find, I’ll except less quality from myself to gain time for leisure. Moore suggests live a bit of mental leisure in-lue of chastising yourself while doing something your not exactly ‘excited” about. The end product of the job may be the same, but you may feel differant … better, more alive, maybe a little spark of added energy … may be worth a try.

I like getting a little “extra” perspectives of life’s treasures.

They help!!

Thanks for stopping bye!!

G.